Open Software: Project Jupyter

Event Details

Open Software: Project Jupyter

Time: October 23, 2018 from 2pm to 4pm
Country: United States of America
Street: 10 Shattuck Street
City/Town: Boston
Website or Map: https://datamanagement.hms.ha…
Event Type: speaker, event
Organized By: Julie Goldman
Latest Activity: Oct 9, 2018

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Event Description

Speaker Talks

Sponsored by Countway Library, Department of Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Program in Therapeutic Science (HiTS)

Project Jupyter has developed and supported the interactive computing products Jupyter Notebook, Jupyter Hub, and Jupyter Lab.

The Jupyter Notebook is an open-source web application that allows you to create and share documents that contain live code, equations, visualizations and narrative text. Notebooks support interactive data science and scientific computing across all programming languages via the development of open-source software.

Join your colleagues for a few demonstrations on how open source software and technologies are being used to promote transparency, reusability, and reproducibility. 

Speakers:

  • Jeremy Muhlich, Research Associate, Deputy Director of Modeling and Informatics, Laboratory of Systems Pharmacology, Harvard Program in Therapeutic Science
  • Kartik Subramanian, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Laboratory of Systems Pharmacology, Harvard Program in Therapuetic Sciences
  • Gregoire Versmee, MD, MPH, Research Fellow in Biomedical Informatics, Avillach Lab, Department of Biomedical Informatics
  • Laura Versmee, MD, Research Fellow in Biomedical Informatics, Avillach Lab, Department of Biomedical Informatics

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